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01/13

Aerial view of Matterhorn / Cervino summit, Aosta Valley, Italy. VEDUTA AEREA foto, Valle d'Aosta, Italia.

Undoubtedly, Matterhorn / Cervino (elevation: 4478m) is the most known mountain physiognomically due to its massive, near perfect pyramidal shape. Its summit was reached for the first time in 1865 by a party of seven led by Edward Whymper. This aerial view from the east shows the Furggen Ridge which separates the Aosta Valley in Italy (left of ridge) from the Canton of Valais in Switzerland. The Furggen Ridge also separates the drainage basin of the Po to the Adriatic Sea (left of ridge) from the basin of the Rhône to the Mediterranean Sea. Breuil-Cervinia, Aosta Valley, Italy / Zermatt, Canton of Valais, Switzerland.

Aerial view of Mount Breithorn, Aosta Valley, Italy. VEDUTA AEREA foto, Valle d'Aosta, Italia.

Italian side of Breithorn (elevation: 4164m) and its south facing glacier. On the left where the glacier flattens out, is the Breithorn Plateau. This plateau, straddling the Italian / Swiss border is reachable, either from Breuil-Cervinia (Italy) or Zermatt (Switzerland) with Europe’s highest ski lift: 3899m at Gobba di Rollin. This site is called Matterhorn Glacier Paradise. It offers 365 days a year of skiing on Europe’s largest summer ski area with 21 km (360 km in winter) of groomed ski runs in a truly spectacular landscape. In the distance, slightly above the horizon line is the Weisshorn summit (elevation: 4506m). Ayas, Aosta Valley, Italy.

Aerial view of Les Grandes Jorasses, Aosta Valley, Italy. VEDUTA AEREA foto, Valle d'Aosta, Italia.

This formidable barrier is the Italian side of the Grandes Jorasses, high above the Val Ferret, hidden here by a sea of clouds. Its southeastern orientation explains the rockier physiognomy and the smaller glaciers. The Aiguille Verte can be seen on the left in the distance. Courmayeur, Aosta Valley, Italy.

Aerial view of Les Grandes Jorasses, Aosta Valley, Italy. VEDUTA AEREA foto, Valle d'Aosta, Italia.

The Dent du Géant (elevation: 4014 meters) to the Grandes Jorasses (elevation: 4208 meters) ridgeline separates two watersheds and two countries: the Po basin in Italy and the Rhône basin in France. Courmayeur, Aosta Valley, Italy.

Aerial view of Les Grandes Jorasses, Aosta Valley, Italy. VEDUTA AEREA foto, Valle d'Aosta, Italia.

At an elevation of 4208 meters, Pointe Walker is the highest peak of the Grandes Jorasses. Its first ascent was led by Horace Walker in 1868. in 1865, famed mountain climber, Edward Whymper had reached the second highest peak, Pointe Whymper (4184 meters) which is adjacent to Pointe Walker. Courmayeur, Aosta Valley, Italy.

Aerial view of the Mont Blanc Massif, Aosta Valley, Italy. VEDUTA AEREA foto, Valle d'Aosta, Italia.

Italian side of the southern Mont Blanc Massif from Aiguille de Tré de la Tête (elevation: 3846 meters) to Mont Blanc (elevation: 4807 meters). Val Veny, Courmayeur, Aosta Valley, Italy.

Aerial view of the Mont Blanc summit, Aosta Valley, Italy. VEDUTA AEREA foto, Italia.

Viewed from the southeast, the summit of Mont Blanc is very much different than when viewed from the northwest; it is steeper, rockier and with much smaller glaciers. Val Veny, Courmayeur, Aosta Valley, Italy.

Aerial view of Aiguille de Triolet and Mont Dolent, Aosta Valley, Italy. VEDUTA AEREA foto, Valle d'Aosta, Italia.

Aiguille de Leschaux (3859 meters), Aiguille de Triolet (3870 meters) and Mont Dolent (3820 meters) overlooking Val Ferret by an impressive two kilometers of vertical drop. Courmayeur, Aosta Valley, Italy.

Aerial view of Mont Blanc and Brenva Glacier, Aosta Valley, Italy. VEDUTA AEREA foto, Monte Bianco, Italia.

Aiguille de Triolet (3870 meters) and Mont Dolent (3820 meters). At the summit of Mont Dolent, the boundaries of three countries meet; Italy (seen here), France and Switzerland. Courmayeur, Val Ferret, Aosta Valley, Italy.

Aerial view of Fénis Castle on a hilltop, Aosta Valley, Italy. VEDUTA AEREA foto, Castello di Fénis, Italia.

The first mention of Fénis Castle dates back to 1242. The most important construction project took place in the 14th century under the supervision of the Lords of Challant (who owned the castle until 1716). Although the castle has two imposing surrounding walls, it was built more as a display of prestige than a defensive fort. Some important renovations were done in 1895 and 1935. Fénis, Aosta Valley, Italy.

Aerial view of Fénis Castle, Aosta Valley, Italy. VEDUTA AEREA foto, Valle d'Aosta, Italia.

The medieval Fénis Castle is situated on a small hill overlooking the town of Fénis. The castle belongs to the Regional Council and is a great asset to the promotion of tourism as this historical structure is eye-catching with its many towers and ornate, pronounced battlements. This Aosta Valley’s landmark is one of the most visited site in the region. Fénis, Aosta Valley, Italy.

Aerial view of Cly Castle, Ruins in Aosta Valley, Italy. VEDUTA AEREA foto, Castello di Cly, Italia.

The ruins of Cly Castle stand perched on a rocky promontory about 300 meters above the Dora Baltea River in the Aosta Valley. Its origins are believed to date from around the 11th century. Saint-Denis, Aosta Valley, Italy.

Aerial view of Châtillon Parish, churches in Aosta Valley, Italy. VEDUTA AEREA foto, Italia.

The Parish Church of San Pietro was inaugurated in 1905. It dominates the medieval town of Châtillon. Aosta Valley, Italy.

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